(Source: naturehomes)




(Source: wetheurban)



etsyifyourenasty:

Fluorescent Buns

etsyifyourenasty:

Fluorescent Buns



benjaminheath:

Monument Valley at dawn. 

benjaminheath:

Monument Valley at dawn. 



jaredchambers:

Inyo County

jaredchambers:

Inyo County



(Source: justloveforus)



(Source: cigarettewaltz)



(Source: minked)



(Source: subconsciousflow)



fuckyeahportland:

sweatersforchai:

non-stop anal | #pdx

get it, portland

fuckyeahportland:

sweatersforchai:

non-stop anal | #pdx

get it, portland



(Source: lunacourtois)



myidealhome:

tiny back porch (via Design*Sponge)

myidealhome:





patagonia:

A monk prays to the sound of music during the climbing Puja ceremony at the Pangboche Monastery. The ceremony is meant to bring safe passage and good fortune to the climbers going for the summit of Everest.
On April 18, 2014 an avalanche on Mount Everest swept through a line of Sherpas preparing a climbing route for commercial clients. 16 men were killed, making it the deadliest day in the mountain’s history. 10 photographers who have worked extensively with the Sherpa people are donating a selection photographs of the Everest region and its people, curated by National Geographic and Outside Magazine editors, to benefit the Sherpa community. 100% of the proceeds (after the cost of printing) will go to the community via the nonprofit Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation, http://alexlowe.org/, which has been working with Sherpa climbers in the Khumbu since 2003. Visit http://www.sherpasfund.org/ to see the prints and get more information. photo: Max Lowe

patagonia:

A monk prays to the sound of music during the climbing Puja ceremony at the Pangboche Monastery. The ceremony is meant to bring safe passage and good fortune to the climbers going for the summit of Everest.

On April 18, 2014 an avalanche on Mount Everest swept through a line of Sherpas preparing a climbing route for commercial clients. 16 men were killed, making it the deadliest day in the mountain’s history. 10 photographers who have worked extensively with the Sherpa people are donating a selection photographs of the Everest region and its people, curated by National Geographic and Outside Magazine editors, to benefit the Sherpa community. 100% of the proceeds (after the cost of printing) will go to the community via the nonprofit Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation, http://alexlowe.org/, which has been working with Sherpa climbers in the Khumbu since 2003. Visit http://www.sherpasfund.org/ to see the prints and get more information. photo: Max Lowe




instagram:

Capturing Moments in Rural Brazil with @suckeruser

For more photos and videos from Eduardo, follow @suckeruser on Instagram.

“Once when I was really little, I found my mother’s camera lying around. I grabbed it without her permission and went around taking photographs. When she found out she was pretty angry, especially because film was so expensive at the time. I remember begging her to let me reveal the film, since I was dying to see the photos I’d taken. I think that was the day I fell in love with photography as well as the possibility of capturing moments,” recalls Brazil Instagrammer Eduardo Pedro (@suckeruser).

16-year-old Eduardo is now in his first year of college studying law, though he says his true love is photography. Growing up in a rural part of of the northeastern state of Ceará contributed to his love of photography: “The simplicity and beauty of things here inspires me both in my life and in my photography.” When shooting, he often uses his friends as models. “My friends definitely suffer a bit with me behind the camera. I’m always telling them to jump, run and lie down. I guess they are more guinea pigs than models.”

Eduardo’s passion extends to both analog and mobile photography. He says, “I love shooting on my phone. I think mobile photography has allowed lots of people to develop their eye as photographers, reinforcing that what really matters is the creativity one uses rather than the equipment itself. It’s been wonderful to see photography evolve and people start to recognize its ability to eternalize moments. That is really beautiful.”